Unconscious Mutterings

Unconscious mutterings from lunanina.com
mutteringsredanim

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I say … and you think … ? Try these before you look at mine.

  1. Pain ::
  2. Lego ::
  3. Trooper ::
  4. Flicker ::
  5. Character ::
  6. Determined ::
  7. Wing ::
  8. Control ::
  9. Automatic ::
  10. Yeah ::

Here are mine

I say … and you think … ?

  1. Pain ::  in the ass
  2. Lego ::  warrior
  3. Trooper ::  Starship
  4. Flicker ::  Flickr
  5. Character :: actor
  6. Determined :: Bound and
  7. Wing :: Man
  8. Control :: Freak
  9. Automatic :: Weapon
  10. Yeah :: Yeahs  (Yeah Yeahs)

And … Judging by my answers,  it’s apparently all about violence here in my corner of the universe.  I’ve been in a great mood all day for a change.  Jumped in Bob’s car and laid rubber in front of him just for fun.  Why does feeling good and driving fast go together for me?  Or at least, why do I want to drive fast if I feel good?  Am I a 15 year old male?  I could have taken my car on the errand but the G35 is just so much more fun if I feel good.

Spring has sprung,

… the grass is riz.
I wonder where the birdies is?

I post that poem every spring,  generally along with references to the ornamental pear trees in the front yard that smell, when they bloom,  exactly like cum.    Now you have to look at the Picasa web album pictures for the pear trees (link below).

Here’s a little tree across the street, almond, I think.  I had to walk over and get pictures after I got back from the gym this morning.  They all looked so pretty, and it’s been raining for so long!  It’s almost sunny today!

Click here to see more trees.  Plus, a feral kitten.

almond

I knew that

EXERCISE & IMMUNITY

Boost T Cells 67% with Regular Activity

Upper respiratory infections are the most common illnesses in the world. The average person gets 2 to 3 such bouts a year. Dipping temperatures challenge immune function — but what about reduced activity levels brought on by colder weather? Could be, according to research from Professor David Nieman of Appalachian State University, whose research shows regular moderate exercise boosts immunity.

Dr. Nieman studied a group of elderly [is this PC?  I think NOT –ed] women comparing immune response with activity levels. What he found: “The thin, active older women had T cells that functioned 67% higher than other women, at a rate that was equal to women 40 years of age.” Another study found a triple incidence of colds among inactive post-menopausal women, compared with those who walked for 45 minutes, 5 days a week.

In addition to exercise, fortify your immune defenses by choosing Superfoods for Your Immunity, like broccoli, spinach, cashews, guava, plums and mango. Other ways to optimize your immunity include vaccination, hand washing, adequate sleep and meditation.

No longer a Junior Citizen

The New Old Age

GOODBYE, SPRY CODGERS. SO LONG, FEISTY CRONES.

By Jane Gross

Comparable to racism and sexism, “ageism” refers to stereotyping and prejudice directed at individuals and groups because of their age. The term is believed to have been coined in 1969 by gerontologist Dr. Robert N. Butler, the founder of the International Longevity Center in New York City, which as recently as two years ago published a comprehensive report on the problem.

Now the center, along with Aging Services of California, has put together a stylebook to guide media professionals through the minefield of politically correct and politically incorrect ways of identifying and portraying the elderly.

Lesson one. “Elderly” is a word the two organizations would prefer we eliminate. Oops. We have used it here often.

But now we know better. In the glossary of the new stylebook, “Media Takes: On Aging,’’ the authors state their case against “elderly” as follows.

Use this word carefully and sparingly. The term is appropriate only in generic phrases that do not refer to specific individuals, such as concern for the elderly, a home for the elderly, etc. In other words, describing a person as elderly is bad form, although the generalized category “elderly” might not be offensive. (Suggested substitutions include “older adult” or simply “man’’ or “woman” with the age inserted, if relevant.)

Also to be avoided are “senior citizen” (we don’t refer to people under age 50 as “junior citizens,” the guide notes) and “golden years” (euphemisms are probably not the best way to go, we learn). “Feisty,” “spry,” “feeble,” “eccentric,” “senile” and “grandmotherly” are also unwelcome terms, patronizing and demeaning, as is calling someone “80 years young.”

The guide is ambivalent on use of the word “home” as a replacement for “skilled nursing facility.” On the one hand, it can be both anachronistic and condescending to harken back to “old folks’ homes,” which is one of the reasons Aging Services of California changed its name from the California Association of Homes and Services for the Aging. But elsewhere the guide notes (see paragraph four above) that “these facilities are indeed people’s homes,” often permanently. Thus, the people who live there should be called “residents” rather than “patients.”

The guide’s other “obviously ageist words and phrases to avoid” seem far less ambiguous. Among them are “biddy,” “codger,” “coot,” “crone,” “fogy,” “fossil,” “geezer,” “hag,” “old fart,” “old goat,” “prune,” “senile old fool” and “vegetable.” None of these — whew! — have appeared in The New Old Age. (Until now.)


—————

Okay, I use geezer a lot.  Also, Old Fart.  But mostly to refer to people my own age with whom I like to take verbal liberties for the primary purpose of  poking fun.   This probably means that I, too, am a Fossil.  Crone. Biddy.  Prune.  Or maybe a Fogey, which I think they spelt incorectly up there.

My spellchecker doesn’t agree.